nonasuch:

Having grown up in DC, statues of various dead guys on horses are basically background radiation, or they were before I became Hamilton trash and started noticing them again. Now it’s like every time I turn around there’s a Founding Father looking at me like I personally disappointed him, and it’s getting a little unnerving.

Although: as a result, I sort of want to write a magical realism thing where that can really happen. Where if you do something they would have disagreed with strongly enough, the statues climb down off their columns and lumber down Mass Ave to the Russell Building or the Capitol, where they stand on the sidewalk, arms crossed, glaring into the window of whoever’s just introduced legislation that offended them. They don’t speak, or attack anyone, or damage anything– well, they do tend to bump their heads on low-handing streetlights, sometimes, but that doesn’t count. Mostly they just stand there, mournful, accusing, for everyone to see.

Sometimes lawmakers can talk them around, convince them they’re not actually betraying the political ideals of their predecessors. Politicians who are good at this tend to have much, much longer careers than the ones who aren’t. Politicians who piss off the wrong statues seldom get reelected.

George Washington rarely budges, and when he does it’s front-page news, nationwide. Madison’s always been easier to talk around than most. Hamilton spend more time off his plinth than on it, but he cools off fast. Jefferson holds grudges, to the point that hardly anyone worries too much about making him mad. 

It’s not just politicians, either, and they don’t always come to life in anger. Joan of Arc’s bronze horse will shiver to life in Malcolm X Park, sometimes, and carry her off to join protest marches, when she thinks their cause is just. Gandhi walked with Iraq War protestors. The Spirit of American Womanhood, outside Constitution Hall, danced on the day that Roe v. Wade was decided, and when Obergefell vs. Hodge went through, Eleanor Roosevelt taught a clumsy Lindy to Baron von Steuben. 

Lincoln has only risen from his seat once since he was put there in 1922, and that was to nod in solemn approval at LBJ from the White House lawn.

Some cities rarely put up statues, and many have taken theirs down. Paris has a great many artists and writers memorialized, and curiously few politicians. In London, during the Blitz, Nelson shinned down his column to help dig people out of collapsed buildings, until he was broken to pieces himself; he stands atop the column again today, reassembled, but has never moved since. In the last months of the Soviet Union, a desperate Communist Party had the statues of Moscow chained in place. These days, Monument Avenue in Richmond is punctuated with  a long series of empty plinths and bare columns. 

But DC keeps theirs, and keeps building more.

slimwhistler:

elemesy:

megsokay:

womaninterrupted:

life-is-just-a-classr00m:

I mean, sometimes you wait for 13 hours to get @hamiltonthemusical cancellation tickets and end up seated next to Harrison Ford, with Meryl Streep and Emma Thompson directly behind you. It’s fine. I’m okay. 

Isn’t that Ted Danson behind them too?

WITH MARY STEENBURGEN?!?!?!?

(BTW, Danson totally photobombed that first selfie)

I WANT TO KNOW IF HARRISON CRIED

Okay, wow.

et-in-arkadia:

impetusofadream:

kjack89:

Ugh I just…as much as I loved the video of Lin-Manuel and Emma Watson sorting Hamilton characters into Hogwarts Houses, I was hoping that we had maybe gotten to the point where we can stop automatically casting the protagonist in Gryffindor without any further discussion because seriously. Hamilton is a Slytherin.

Hamilton’s defining characteristic is his ambition, his burning desire to make a name for himself and to leave a legacy. It’s what motivates just about every decision he makes. That’s not a Gryffindor quality (I mean, I’m not saying that Gryffindors can’t be ambitious, any more than Slytherins can’t be brave – it’s just a much more defining characteristic of Slytherins [”And power-hungry Slytherin loved those of great ambition”]). From the beginning, Hamilton is obsessed with making a name for himself and while that allows him to make some choices that seem brave or noble on their surface, they’re all with the goal of rising above his station (consider: anything in the Revolutionary War; the Reynolds Pamphlet; even his death).

In many ways, Burr, who I also consider a Slytherin, and Hamilton represent both ends of Slytherin spectrum – both would use any means to achieve their ends, though their means are quite opposite. And for both of them, ambition and pride is their downfall, though again, in different and contrasting ways.

And in the Harry Potter universe, it becomes clearer that Hamilton would be a Slytherin. Imagine little eleven-year-old bastard orphan (son of a whore and a Scotsman…) Hamilton rolling up to Hogwarts with no name, just the burning need to make a name for himself. And when he puts the Sorting Hat on his head and tells him, “A nice thirst to prove yourself…You could be great, and Slytherin will help you on your way to greatness”, how could Hamilton say anything but yes?

(And of course, imagine little Hamilton running up to the Slytherin prefect Aaron Burr, when first-years aren’t supposed to just talk to prefects, to ask him in that piping voice, “Pardon me, are you Aaron Burr, sir?”)

(And then also imagine Burr and Hamilton many years later, facing each other, wands raised, both prepared to do whatever it took – Hamilton aiming his wand at the sky, Burr firing the curse that would kill Hamilton and break him, in the end.)

I’d go on, including more from Hamilton’s actual life instead of just the show, but instead I’ll stop here and say TLDR – #yourfavoritesareslytherin2k16

I agree with this so hard.

slytherin pride (shout it from the rooftops)

ekjohnston:

the-oxford-english-fangeek:

timetoputmythoughtsdown:

Alexander Hamilton

The opening song from the musical Hamilton performed in American Sign Language by that one girl who did the Guns and Ships one that you really liked!

@linmanuel

Link to the performer Hannah’s original youtube video so you can drop a like/comment over there as well 🙂

I think of all the versions of this play I hope to see some day, I want to see this one the most.