Famous authors, their writings and their rejection letters.

philosophuckingphy:

cidermoon:

ramoorebooks:

  • Sylvia PlathThere certainly isn’t enough genuine talent for us to take notice.
  • Rudyard KiplingI’m sorry Mr. Kipling, but you just don’t know how to use the English language.
  • Emily Dickinson[Your poems] are quite as remarkable for defects as for beauties and are generally devoid of true poetical qualities.
  • Ernest Hemingway (on The Torrents of Spring): It would be extremely rotten taste, to say nothing of being horribly cruel, should we want to publish it.
  • Dr. SeussToo different from other juveniles on the market to warrant its selling.
  • The Diary of Anne FrankThe girl doesn’t, it seems to me, have a special perception or feeling which would lift that book above the ‘curiosity’ level.
  • Richard Bach (on Jonathan Livingston Seagull): will never make it as a paperback. (Over 7.25 million copies sold)
  • H.G. Wells (on The War of the Worlds): An endless nightmare. I do not believe it would “take”…I think the verdict would be ‘Oh don’t read that horrid book’. And (on The Time Machine): It is not interesting enough for the general reader and not thorough enough for the scientific reader.
  • Edgar Allan PoeReaders in this country have a decided and strong preference for works in which a single and connected story occupies the entire volume.
  • Herman Melville (on Moby Dick): We regret to say that our united opinion is entirely against the book as we do not think it would be at all suitable for the Juvenile Market in [England]. It is very long, rather old-fashioned…
  • Jack London[Your book is] forbidding and depressing.
  • William FaulknerIf the book had a plot and structure, we might suggest shortening and revisions, but it is so diffuse that I don’t think this would be of any use. My chief objection is that you don’t have any story to tell. And two years later: Good God, I can’t publish this!
  • Stephen King (on Carrie): We are not interested in science fiction which deals with negative utopias. They do not sell.
  • Joseph Heller (on Catch–22): I haven’t really the foggiest idea about what the man is trying to say… Apparently the author intends it to be funny – possibly even satire – but it is really not funny on any intellectual level … From your long publishing experience you will know that it is less disastrous to turn down a work of genius than to turn down talented mediocrities.
  • George Orwell (on Animal Farm): It is impossible to sell animal stories in the USA.
  • Oscar Wilde (on Lady Windermere’s Fan): My dear sir, I have read your manuscript. Oh, my dear sir.
  • Vladimir Nabokov (on Lolita): … overwhelmingly nauseating, even to an enlightened Freudian … the whole thing is an unsure cross between hideous reality and improbable fantasy. It often becomes a wild neurotic daydream … I recommend that it be buried under a stone for a thousand years.
  • The Tale of Peter Rabbit was turned down so many times, Beatrix Potter initially self-published it.
  • Lust for Life by Irving Stone was rejected 16 times, but found a publisher and went on to sell about 25 million copies.
  • John Grisham’s first novel was rejected 25 times.
  • Jack Canfield and Mark Victor Hansen (Chicken Soup for the Soul) received 134 rejections.
  • Robert Pirsig (Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance) received 121 rejections.
  • Gertrude Stein spent 22 years submitting before getting a single poem accepted.
  • Judy Blume, beloved by children everywhere, received rejections for two straight years.
  • A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle received 26 rejections.
  • Frank Herbert’s Dune was rejected 20 times.
  • Carrie by Stephen King received 30 rejections.
  • The Diary of Anne Frank received 16 rejections.
  • Harry Potter and The Philosopher’s Stone by J.K. Rolling was rejected 12 times.
  • Dr. Seuss received 27 rejection letters

Now this…THIS inspires me.

Okay but I feel the same way about Lolita even today

enfiber:

Learning to Break It Down

So for today’s lesson, I’m using what I consider the ultimate in knitwear porn.  This was designed by Jean Paul Gaultier and I’m kicking myself for not realizing I could have seen it in front of me at the De Young museum exhibit in San Francisco while I was there.  Jebus, it’s stunning.

There’s a technique that I want to teach you whenever you are looking at inspiration.  And that’s breaking things down into their technical elements.  

You can see a simplified breakdown in the last picture.  The upper body of the garment is actually just a really good version of a ribbing and cable panel sweater.  The cable panels are all different, and all used in slightly different ways.  They’re not symmetrical, which adds tremendously to the sheer excitement of this garment. (Now there’s an easy to add dose of inspiration to add to whatever you’re making… panels of stitch patterns don’t have to be applied symmetrically.)

The bottom is a crochet lace base.  There’s another idea… mixing up knitting and crochet.  There’s no rules that say it has to be one or the other.  

There’s a tremendous amount of surface detailing, from the applied i-cord, to those wonderful flowers and grapes.  And it manages to do it in a way that isn’t overwhelming.  Don’t get me wrong.  I love Nicky Epstein as much as the next person.  But a wide shawl collar filled with knitted roses is a bit much.  This shows that careful application of surface detailing has a much greater impact.

So break it down.  Look at those ideas.  It’s not about ripping off other designers or attempting to recreate what they made.  It’s about expanding the potential of design and seeing how different looks are accomplished and then using those ideas and elements in your own way.

Progressive

sadydoyle:

Let’s start, this time, with a story. This is about Hillary Clinton – everything I write seems to be about her these days – but it’s about me, too. It’s about what it means, to be a feminist, or a woman on the left, and whether it matters. So before I get to her, let’s give you a good look at me. 

I’m at a job interview. It seems like I actually have a shot at this one. Someone who likes me knows the boss here, and has talked me up to him in person. I can show him my most recent performance review, in which I’m described as “a joy to work with,” that “my editors fight over who gets to edit my pieces,” and where the “places for improvement” section mentions they actually have to “wrack their brains for something I could do better.” I’ve come prepared to talk about my strong, built-in reader base, which I built from the ground up; the fact that I’ve led several social media campaigns that received national or international press attention and raised substantial funds, one of which was enthusiastically endorsed by several pro-choice members of Congress; my award for social media activism, from a prestigious women’s media organization, which I won by popular vote; the fact that I wind up at or near the top of my magazine’s “most-read” traffic list every time I publish a new piece.

I can mention other things, basic work-ethic things. I can mention that I have not voluntarily taken a vacation day or a sick day for the past 18 months, and that the last sick day I took was only because I was hospitalized. (I do have to take the day off on federal holidays, but on those days, I usually write for fun.) I can mention that I have never been late filing a piece. I can mention that the copy comes in clean, doesn’t require much editing, and gets turned around quickly, with maximum co-operation. I can talk about all that, at my job interview. Those are the questions I’m prepared to answer.

I’m not prepared for the question they ask.

“We’re a progressive site,” the man across the table begins, “And our readership, as with most progressive sites, is mostly men. You’ve focused a lot on women’s issues. Would you be comfortable writing something that men would be able to read?”

Keep reading

tenderule34:

lancerbuck:

chilotero:

assgod:

mockwa:

Девушки на каблуках

This was better watched muted

I like all my scenic fingerpainting videos with sick dubstep music

And they tell us finger-painting is just for little kids…

This is actually a pretty nice tutorial on how color can be good by itself!

Jean Valjean’s eyes had assumed a frightful expression. They were no longer eyes; they were those deep and glassy objects which replace the glance in the case of certain wretched men, which seem unconscious of reality, and in which flames the reflection of terrors and of catastrophes. He was not looking at a spectacle, he was seeing a vision. He tried to rise, to flee, to make his escape; he could not move his feet. Sometimes, the things that you see seize upon you and hold you fast. He remained nailed to the spot, petrified, stupid, asking himself, athwart confused and inexpressible anguish, what this sepulchral persecution signified, and whence had come that pandemonium which was pursuing him.

On Jean Valjean seeing a passing chain gang in Paris. (Hugo, Les Miserables, Book, Volume 4, Book Two, Chapter VIII)

Valjean exhibiting some classic signs of PTSD after being triggered by the sight of a convict transport

(via autumngracy)

diskothi-queer:

now that donald trump is the actual GOP nominee this is your reminder that voting for a Democrat You Hate is still a useful harm reduction procedure that will cancel out a vote for Trump. please practice harm reduction. please, even more importantly in small/red states, vote all the way down in your local races where the margins of victory can be 100 votes or 10 votes, so your state legislature/governor/etc will be strong, if/when everything on the national level goes to hell

believe what you want about your vote not having the intended or ideal level of power, believe what you want about the electoral college or the modern role of voting in a democratic society, believe what you want about american centrism or flawed systems, but don’t let anyone tell you there’s “no difference” in the general election, please don’t let anyone tell you voting does nothing. your vote CAN and WILL protect vulnerable people and help you stand in for people whose votes are being taken away by a gutted VRA and gerrymandering 

please. please vote tuesday november 8th. please.

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pizzaotter:

joanbaezwife:

94li:

wtf….I can’t even walk without tripping how she do that……

this is so beautiful

Ok no but seriously what board is that cruiser because it’s flex is literally next level shit and I need one.

all-hands-on-deck-granger:

Alright guys. Here it is. The thing I’ve been working on for the past three weeks: a sweet mashup trailer for the Prequel Trilogy using the music from the trailer for The Force Awakens – finished just in time for the film’s release. Well, almost. The goal I set for myself was to create a trailer that showed that the Prequels could be just as compelling as the other films in the saga. I’m incredibly proud of it and hope it’s successful in highlighting what I feel were the best parts of the Prequel Trilogy.

matters-from-ashes:

theworldisconfused:

ep0nine:

saramcclarinet:

brainbowunicorn:

Sometimes I just start singing and my mom joins in

Whoa…

#don’t trust this
#they’re probably sirens

That, my friends, is the O Magnum Mysterium by Tomás Luis de Victoria. I would love to live in a house where people just casually sing music like this

No. These people are, in fact, sirens.