zaiatzgeistbeth:

callmebliss:

ancestorsofthenorse:

This beautiful Swedish lady sings an ancient Viking song. Now watch how the cows respond. 

It is often argued that everything our ancestors did and said gets stored into our brains. Their experience and knowledge gets passed down from generation to generation. This may explain why we know or react to certain things without having any prior knowledge.

Kulning is an ancient herding call used in the Scandinavian region. The call is a high pitch tone that can reach long distances. The herding call sounds more like a haunting and sad melody meant to echo through mountains and alleys.

It was getting late and foggy on a magical night last month when Swedish artist Jonna Jinton wanted to try kulning. She wanted to find out if the animals would answer to the call their own ancestors heard when the women called them. Kulning might just be one of the most beautiful and enchanting sounds ever made.

Never in my life have I so badly wanted to be able to download the audio from a video.

*whispers* vidtomp3.com

bonifidebaritone:

thisismyblogyo:

ultrafacts:

Source

Follow Ultrafacts for more facts

Here, put this candy in your annoying mouth and shut up.

They’re like adult pacifiers

killbenedictcumberbatch:

slothesaurus:

iskabee:

hi, a psa

if u are a fool like me and write in google docs (??? why. love your vision.), at some point you’ve probably shoved your face under a thick comforter into pitch darkness to allow your liquefied eyeballs to re-solidify since docs doesn’t provide any default tools to MURDER THAT HELLISH WHITE BACKGROUND with and f.lux only does so much. well if you’re younger you probably don’t give a shit but after you’ve set up your 401k and find yourself proud of matching your employer’s contributions, you’re probably at that age where u leo decaprio squint at your computer screen at all hours of the day whether it’s dark or not. anyway, this exists as an add-on:

BAM

and it has those diff options on the side to keep ur pastel aesthetic intact and it helps a little bit, enabling you to go blind slower wowe isn’t that wild

Hi! Sorry to hijack your post but I thought maybe I could help with this. I suffer from chronic migraines and use gdocs A LOT for my previous jobs and currently for writing. The white background is murder and your brightness levels can only provide so much mercy.

I wasn’t aware of this add-on and I do love me some pastels, but I found out about an add-on called Dark Reader for chrome. My previous job required a lot of excel and data crunching so WHITE EVERYWHERE PAIN AUGH.

I’ll be using the images from the add-on previews since my computer is hella slow.

Dark reader is basically a color inversion add-on, but a little smarter. Sometimes it inverts photos, sometimes it doesn’t.

What I really love it is how it’s customizable

You can turnit on or off easily and set the preferences to your liking.

Absolute FAVE thing about it is that you can assign urls or websites you want darkened or excluded. So, say, you’re okay with Tumblr’s default colors you can have that excluded. Inversely, you can just put in the url of your gdoc document so that it’s the only thing inverted.

It’s been a real wonder for me and my migraines. I use it in combination with f.lux and lowest brightness settings. Hope this helps, and again, sorry for the hijack!

Dark Reader show me the advanced levels of optical comfort

airyairyquitecontrary:

invisiblelad:

theweekmagazine:

Britain just issued a travel warning for LGBT people headed to U.S.

It’s that bad.

In the eyes of the British government, the U.S. may now be a risky destination for LGBT travelers. The British Foreign Office posted a travel advisory update to its website Tuesday warning members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities about anti-LGBT laws passed recently in North Carolina and Mississippi. “The U.S. is an extremely diverse society and attitudes towards LGBT people differ hugely across the country,” the advisory reads. “LGBT travelers may be affected by legislation passed recently in the states of North Carolina and Mississippi.”

The advisory also provides a map that marks countries around the world — including Turkmenistan, Pakistan, Nicaragua, as well as much of northern Africa and the Middle East — that also have anti-LGBT laws, and includes a few more pieces of travel advice. “Some hotels, especially in rural areas, won’t accept bookings from same-sex couples — check before you go,” the British government warns, noting that LGBT travelers should also “exercise discretion” in rural areas and avoid “excessive physical shows of affection” when in public.

This is the type of thing that I think would come as a shock to some Americans, as to how SCARY their country appears to many of us in the rest of the world.
(And that’s allowing for the fact that many of our countries can be scary in their own ways.)

beardednegro:

Previously, I’d only seen the first two panels and assumed it was the complete comic.

This version is much better.


ADDENDUM: As this approaches 100,000 notes as of this writing (less than three days after it was first posted), there are a couple of things that need to be added, and I prefer to add them to the original post, rather than to a reblog.

FIRST… there are a number of reblogs and replies–mostly from white males who see their precious capitalism threatened–that ignore the point of the comic and go after the fact that the people pictured didn’t pay for a ticket to get into the stadium.

If you need to see the point without the barrier (hah) of this particular comic, imagine this scenario instead. The scene is the maternity ward of a hospital. A joyful father is looking into the nursery window to see his newborn daughter…

  • First panel (equality): The father’s older child–a son–is standing next to him, wanting to see his new little sister. The boy is too short and can’t see into the window, but he and Dad are on equal footing. This is “equality.”
  • Second panel (equity): Dad picks the kid up so he be at an equal height and peer into the window at his sister. This is equity.
  • Third panel (removal of the systemic barrier): Instead of a window, the entire wall is made of transparent glass. The nurse brings the newborn over to show dad, and then squats down to show little brother as well.

Better? Everyone complaining about them watching the game “illegally” can now shut the fuck up.

SECOND… there have been a couple of inquiries about the source. Turns out, the original was indeed the first two panels only. It was an MS Paint image thrown
together by a business professor named Craig Froehle to illustrate the difference between
equality of opportunity and equality of outcomes. The three-panel version featuring the removal of the barrier is one of many adaptations.

For the somewhat fascinating story behind the original and how it came to be adapted in myriad ways, see https://medium.com/@CRA1G/the-evolution-of-an-accidental-meme-ddc4e139e0e4

That’s it!

belinsky:

‘staring into the camera like you’re on the office’ is such an interesting cultural phenomenon because it points to one of my very favorite things in pop culture, which is the use of commonly known fictional situations to indicate an emotion or context that is extremely specific and can’t necessarily be communicated with language alone.

why do characters on the office look into the camera?  on the office, the characters are being filmed as part of a documentary; they understand they are being filmed and can acknowledge that fourth wall and those theoretical future viewers.  but because the office is a comedy, that fourth wall acknowledgement is not about explaining motivations or gaining approval for an action, but about sharing an agreement with a group of people who are not actually there.  

characters on the office look into the camera when something ridiculous is happening that no one in the room thinks is ridiculous but the person looking at the camera, were they to say ‘this is so ridiculous’ to the people in the room, their comrades in fiction, they would get serious pushback or anger; to those characters the situation is serious.  the character looking into the camera is a more objective viewer, like the audience, and by looking at us they’re putting themselves on our objective team.  and in the future when this ‘documentary’ would air, they would be vindicated as the person who understood that the situation was ridiculous.

so in real life, when we talk about ‘looking into the camera like we’re on the office’, this very specific emotion is what we’re referring to: that we’re in a situation that any objective viewer would find inherently ridiculous, and are seeking acknowledgement from an invisible but much larger group that would agree with us, even though nobody in the situation would do so.  we’re putting ourselves in an outsider position, a less emotional position, and inherently a more powerful position, because we’re not vulnerable to being laughed at like all the ridiculous people we’re among.  we’re among them, but we’re not with them, and the millions of people watching us on theoretical tv would be on our team, not theirs.  that’s such a specific idea and concept, and one that’s really hard to communicate in pure language.  but we can say ‘looking into the camera like we’re on the office’ and it’s much easier to communicate what we mean.

for me that’s what pop culture is for, and why it’s so important that it’s pop culture.  maybe it feels more special if it’s only you and a grape who know that something exists, but the more people consume something, the more its situations and reactions become common knowledge, a sort of communal well from which we can draw to articulate real life problems.  and ultimately, the easier it is for us to communicate and understand each other.

kendallhaleart:

This came to me after living in a town for 5 years where if you aren’t married and having kids, everyone hates you.