Jean Valjean’s eyes had assumed a frightful expression. They were no longer eyes; they were those deep and glassy objects which replace the glance in the case of certain wretched men, which seem unconscious of reality, and in which flames the reflection of terrors and of catastrophes. He was not looking at a spectacle, he was seeing a vision. He tried to rise, to flee, to make his escape; he could not move his feet. Sometimes, the things that you see seize upon you and hold you fast. He remained nailed to the spot, petrified, stupid, asking himself, athwart confused and inexpressible anguish, what this sepulchral persecution signified, and whence had come that pandemonium which was pursuing him.

On Jean Valjean seeing a passing chain gang in Paris. (Hugo, Les Miserables, Book, Volume 4, Book Two, Chapter VIII)

Valjean exhibiting some classic signs of PTSD after being triggered by the sight of a convict transport

(via autumngracy)