A video posted by ayako🇯🇵 (@ponchan918) on May 19, 2016 at 2:54pm PDT

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tptigger:

theroguewriter:

safuratumbles:

violent-choices:

rnashallah:

im SCREAMIBG

I could watch this all day

I just died from the sweetness.

@tptigger here it is

Adorable. And mugging for the camera!

The squee heard ‘round the world!

montereybayaquarium:

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As you probably know by now, a wild baby sea otter was born this morning in our Great Tide Pool! For the last several days, a wild female sea otter had been using the protected basin of our Great Tide Pool to rest from the winter storms. Last night, just as the Aquarium closed, she was spotted once again slinking into the pool for some shut-eye. It’s rare for a healthy sea otter to visit the pool so frequently—we started to wonder if she was doing all right.

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Well, mystery solved! Around 8:30 a.m., Aquarium staff witnessed a BRAND NEW pup resting on her belly, being furiously groomed by a proud momma. We’re talking umbilical-chord-still-attached, whoa-is-that-yep-that’s-the-placenta new-born otter pup!

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In steady waves, Aquarium staff, volunteers, and then the days’ visitors made their way to the back deck to watch a conservation success story taking place—and become fluffier in front of their eyes. Not that long ago, sea otters were hunted to near extinction. Maybe 50 were left in all of California by the early 1800’s. But now, thanks to legislative protection and a change of heart toward these furriest of sea creatures, the otter population has rebounded to steady levels in the MontereyBay, a with 3,000 total in central California. 

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We’ll keep you updated on this new otter family—mom may decide to head out any time. As of this writing though, she’s still grooming her pup and enjoying the comfort of our Great Tide Pool. The cute overload continues.

whitejenna:

mybigfatgaylife:

madmadamemim:

charley-oliver:

missmeanest:

agirlneedsgoals:

tiggermyk:

wideislandblues:

chirpadee:

zkac:

don’t try to tell me otter facts i already know all of them. yes i know otters hold hands. yes i know they keep special rocks. yes i know they use their bellies as tiny tables. i know it all

Oh I hear you Sea otters get all the love and get all their facts spilled all the time. 

But do you know about otters big asshole brother? In South America there are Giant Otters. These are six foot long tubes of muscle who give less fucks then a honey badger. They are Apex predators and very, very good hunters.

 They are known for stealing food from gators. They eat small caiman and friggin anaconda if they venture too close because why the hell not. They also eat Piranha because they fear nothing and consume the weak. They are attracted to watermelon (there are stories of them stealing them out of gardens) Which is weird as heck because they apparently hate the taste. 

Best part. They hunt in packs. These guys are bamf.

No Fucks given

Fight me bro

Giant fucking otters

RODENTS OF UNUSUAL SIZE

I first heard about giant otters in a Kresley Cole book (paranormal romance), and I thought they were interesting so I looked them up and was ASTOUNDED that they were real.  Like, not just “used to be” like dinosaurs, but “currently living” real.

You wasted an opportunity to show the faces they make when they eat watermelon. They obv hate it, they CRY and GRIMACE, and yet they keep eating. Let me fix your mistake for you.

I wanna know what drives them to eat something they find so unappealing. What do watermelons have that they crave??

@morgantonner 

@anotterotter

@whitejenna

…huh. I hadn’t heard about the watermelon before. I’ve only worked with North American River Otters and Asian Small Clawed’s, not these big gorgeous guys, although I’d love to.
Otters cry all the time about anything and everything. The grimacing could just be how they eat/particular frame captured.

speciesofleastconcern?