How to backup your blog if you are actually worried

my-coordinated-chaos:

  • Go to wordpress.com
  • Create a new website. Choose whatever category you think fits your blog best and whatever theme you like. You can just choose the free plan unless you want a custom domain for whatever reason. 
  • Click Settings on the sidebar. 
image

Then click import at the top of the page and go to “Other Importers”

image

From the list that appears, choose “Tumblr”

image

You should be asked to log in. Once you do, all your blogs will appear in a list. 

image

Simply click “Import this blog” and every single one of your posts, including all of their tags, will be imported into wordpress. It will take a very very long time but it should work. You will now have a wordpress website that contains an exact copy of your blog. I would recommend changing it to “Private” in the main settings if you don’t want people thinking that it is active, because at least I know I won’t actually leave tumblr unless it really does shut down, which I don’t think will happen.

Crossposting/Importing Tumblr

copperbadge:

As promised, resources! 

To crosspost to Dreamwidth from Tumblr using IFTT (this has been around a while, but IFTT requires programming skills I didn’t have, so it’s nice someone actually assembled the program for me)

To import an entire Tumblr to WordPress (For archival purposes primarily)

I feel like people maybe flipped out a little more than necessary, so I want to remind everyone that Yahoo tends to beat websites to death and then leave their corpses in the street – Del.icio.us was an anomaly in that respect – so it’s not like Tumblr’s going to disappear tomorrow. If Yahoo sells Tumblr we’ll hear about it first and have time to take appropriate measures. 

(Who the fuck would buy Tumblr? Microsoft. Microsoft, owner of Bing, would buy Tumblr.)

That said, BACKING STUFF UP IS A GOOD IDEA. BACK UP YOUR SHIT. DO IT, LISTEN TO YOUR INTERNET FATHER. You know when I learned this? When in 2008 my livejournal was hacked and I lost five years of my life. I resurrected about 80%, and you know where that 80% came from? Google cache, Archive.org, and notification emails people happened to have saved. BACKUPS. And even then I had to copy and paste every post and repost it backdated. It took me eight months. 

When del.icio.us was sold, data was lost, but more importantly, the data that remained had to be moved, which was when I discovered that about a quarter of the fanfics I’d bookmarked were now deleted, locked, or otherwise missing (this was pre-AO3 but fanfics can be deleted from AO3, and they can be deleted from Tumblr). I rescued a few from archive.org but I also lost a good number, which is why I use Evernote to archive not just the URLs but the stories themselves.  

No technology is infallible, unhackable, virus-proof, or incorruptible. Back up your hard drive, or at least the parts with your favorite music and family photos. Back up your tumblr, or at least the entries that are important to you. Love that fanfic? Save a copy of it

You know what happens to people who don’t back up their shit? They get sanctimonious but ultimately correct lectures from Reed Richards.  

image

BACK YOURSELF UP. LEARN FROM TONY STARK. 

notquiteapolyglot:

involuntaryorange:

fatfeistyandfashionable:

starseed-drops:

drabblemeister:

spookihope:

whenever i’m talking to someone and they tell me about something that happened to them i always tell them about something that happened to me that’s similar to what happened to them. i do it as kind of a “oh hey yeah this happened to me so i can relate to what you’re going through” but i’m always afraid it comes out as “oh yeah well this happened to me so clearly i have it tougher than you” or “i’m done talking about you let’s talk about me”

i swear i don’t mean it like that……..

I run into this a lot with my job – so instead of telling the whole story I say something like, “Oh my gosh, I had something REALLY similar happen. What did you do after that??” And I’ve found that works. Usually they explain and then ask, “So what happened to you?” And then you’re invited to share, and the formula for conversing continues on. 🙂

of all the tumblr posts i’ve read, this one is going to change my life the fastest lol.

Thanks to both the OP for posting a thing that so many of us do, and the responder who gave us a better way to do it. You’re doing the lord’s work, my friend!

Fun fact: there isn’t anything wrong with you if you do what OP is describing.

Deborah Tannen’s work focuses on different conversational styles — the sets of behavioral norms and expectations that we bring with us to conversations. In one of her earlier articles, she describes two conflicting conversational styles that exist in the US. 

One, which she (perhaps inaccurately) dubs “New York Jewish conversational style,” is based on the principle of building camaraderie with one’s interlocutor. The other, which she doesn’t really name but which we could call “mainstream American conversational style,” is based on the principle of not imposing on one’s interlocutor.

Each conversational style has its own behavioral norms. Mainstream American conversational style involves things like asking your interlocutor questions about him/herself and waiting until your interlocutor is clearly finished speaking until you say something. These demonstrate a focus on one’s interlocutor and a clear resistance to imposing. NYJ conversational style involves things like conversational overlaps — speaking at the same time as one’s interlocutor — and “swapping stories.” These demonstrate a high level of engagement with one’s interlocutor. Conversationalists using the mainstream American style make space for each other; conversationalists using the New York Jewish style carve out their own space.

Each of these conversational styles works well when the two people conversing have the same style. Imagine two friends meeting for drinks after work:

“Oh, hello! How was your trip here?”
“Oh, it was awful. There was so much traffic on the turnpike.”
“That’s terrible.”
“I know. How was your trip?”
“Well, there was an accident on the bridge.”
“Oh no! Was there a big backup?”
“Yeah, pretty big.”

“Oh, hi!”
“Hey! Ugh, sorry I’m late, there was so much traffic on the turnpike—”
“Oh my god, I know, there was an accident on the bridge and the cars were backed up a MILE—”
“That is the worst, I remember one time I sat in traffic for an HOUR waiting to get through that toll, they really should—”
“Add more EZ-pass lanes, right?”
“Add more lanes, yeah, exactly.”

Both of these conversations worked: the participants feel that they’ve had their say and that they’ve been understood. They feel connected to their interlocutor.

But when people with conflicting conversational styles converse, that’s where things go wrong. Because we interpret other people’s contributions according to our own conversational style. So the person with mainstream American conversational style comes away thinking “Why did they keep interrupting me? Why didn’t they ask me any questions about me? Why were they so loud and emotional?” And the person with the New York Jewish conversational style comes away thinking “Why were they so disengaged? They didn’t seem involved in the conversation at all. They didn’t even offer any personal information.”

Rather, they would come away thinking that, except that we’re taught growing up that the first example conversation up there is what conversations should look like. So the person with the New York Jewish conversational style actually comes away from the conversation thinking “oh my god, what was I doing? I kept talking about myself. I think I kept interrupting them. I am so rude, god, I’m the worst.” When in fact: a) it’s about cultural difference, not individual moral qualities; and b) one conversational style isn’t inherently “better” than another.

Which isn’t to say that we shouldn’t attempt to bridge the gap between conversational styles, as suggested above. But we should be aware that:

TL;DR: Cultural difference is often mistaken for individual moral failings.

This is actually one of the most interesting things I’ve ever read

tarsdi:

we all have that movie we saw too young and probably scarred us for life.

eirenical:

Hey, guys, I could use a little help here.  ^_^

I’m in the middle of a doctoral program at the moment (because one doctorate just isn’t enough anymore, don’t you know?  ^_^).  I’m pursuing an educational doctorate with an eye towards teaching at a university.  Anyway, I’m currently taking a class on statistics, and as part of that class, my cohort and I are conducting a brief survey.  This information will not be published, nor will it be used for any purpose outside of class.  Also, if you choose to participate, you will remain completely anonymous through the entire process.

The end date for this survey is Monday, July 11, 2016, and it would be a great help to me if you would consider participating.

Here is the link to the survey, if you’re interested: https://hofstra.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_8qsroGreJjMEFBX

Thank you so much!

marauders4evr:

Okay here me out.

A young adult novel written by a disabled author.

Where the main character gets into an accident and must use a wheelchair.

(And is written fairly accurately as the author is also in a wheelchair.)

There are more disabled characters than you can count.

The ones who aren’t disabled are the enemies.

It takes place in an alternate version of the 1950s, at an institution for people with disabilities and superabilities.

You see how the disabilities relate to the superabilities (superpowers). 

The main character goes through the stages of grief after she realizes that she won’t be able to walk again but she is able to come out of it, not because of a love interest, but because she’s able to find her own strength. (And hit her mentor in the face with a weight.)

In fact, the main character doesn’t have any love interest at all.

None.

You could make the argument that she’s aromantic/asexual.

And the author would totally support that argument.

But despite not having a love interest, the main character is truly cared for, especially by her gruff mentor with a heart of gold.

Did somebody say found families and father-figure-daughter-figure relationships?

Also there’s an interracial couple thirty years in the making. 

And an underground resistance of students with disabilities trying to prove that they’re stronger than people think.

And in the end, they’re able to save the day.

And there are a lot of hugs.

And a lot of chocolate milk.

And the main character comes to terms with the fact that her biological family is horrible but she’s fine with that because she’s got the gruff mentor with a heart of gold who may or may not be in the CIA and also knew Al Capone.

And nobody dies.

And nobody dies.

And nobody kills themselves because they think that their lives are over now that they are in fact disabled.

Unlike some other books!

Oh and there’s a pig in a wheelchair.

And it’s all written by a disabled college student who really really needs the money for college and her apartment because apparently life is expensive (who knew?)

And it’s not the best written and it’s not error free but it was written with a lot of heart and a lot of passion in the early hours of the morning because that’s when the author had free time. But if nothing else, it has amazing disability representation. And a pig in a wheelchair.

Interested?

Well, guess what?

That author is me, that book is mine, that book is published, that book is available for you to buy, that book even comes in a paperback version so that you can hold in your hands a story with disability representation in which none of the characters die or talk about how they’re a burden and how they’re lives are over (well, Juniper does once but Ryder knocks some sense into her.)

It’s called The Defectives and you can buy it here:

https://www.amazon.com/Defectives-Burgandi-Rakoska-ebook/dp/B01G7TTLXE?ie=UTF8&qid=1464304077&ref_=sr_1_1&s=digital-text&sr=1-1

So if you’re looking for disability representation that doesn’t end with death and you want to help out a novice disabled author who really needs the money, please consider buying this book.

If nothing else, please signal boost!